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February 5, 2019

Gulf Coast Orthopedics is pleased to introduce Katherine Daigle Weimer, PA-C as a member of our team. Katherine is a native of Thibodaux, La. She attended ED White, Southeastern Louisiana University and earned her Master of Physician Assistant Studies from LSU-New Orleans. Katherine focuses her practice on orthopedic issues of the shoulder and elbow. Her favorite injury to treat is a rotator cuff injury. Kat says, “I love seeing my patients back at the office after they complete their treatment plan. It is very rewarding to be able to help my patients get pain relief.” She resides in Thibodaux with her husband, Jacob and they enjoy traveling. Katherine is available to see patients in our Houma office. Please call us today to schedule your appointment.

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January 22, 2019

Gulf Coast Orthopedics is pleased to announce that effective January 1, 2019 we have added an additional orthopedic provider to our Galliano and Raceland clinics. Nicole Bourgeios, PA-C is now available for patient appointments. Nicole comes to our practice with over 10 years of experience in orthopedics. She is available for general orthopedic evaluations, sports physicals, bone health/osteoporosis evaluations. Nicole has been a lifelong resident of Lafourche Parish. She received her undergraduate degree from LSU Baton Rouge and her PA degree from LSU-Shreveport. She lives in Lockport with her husband, Darby, and their sons. Nicole’s love for orthopedics and caring for her patients is a perfect match. One of the things she enjoys most is seeing her patients at their follow-up appointments and finding them well-pleased with their care and progress. She is motivated by her patients return to wellness. Please call us at 985-868-1540 to schedule your appointment with Nicole. 

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December 31, 2018

 Almost everyone will experience low back pain at some point in their lives. This pain can vary from mild to severe. It can be short-lived or long-lasting. However it happens, low back pain can make many everyday activities difficult to do. There are many causes of low back pain. It sometimes occurs after a specific movement such as lifting or bending. Just getting older also plays a role in many back conditions. As we age, our spines age with us. Aging causes degenerative changes in the spine. These changes can start in our 30s — or even younger — and can make us prone to back pain, especially if we overdo our activities. These aging changes, however, do not keep most people from leading productive, and generally, pain-free lives. We have all seen the 70-year-old marathon runner who, without a doubt, has degenerative changes in her back!  Back pain varies. It may be sharp or stabbing. It can be dull, achy, or feel like a “charley horse” type cramp. The type of pain you have will depend on the underlying cause of your back pain. Most people find that reclining or lying down will improve low back pain, no matter the underlying cause. In general, treatment for low back pain falls into one of three categories: medications, physical medicine, and surgery. Make an appointment with one of our orthop

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December 17, 2018

Frozen shoulder, also called adhesive capsulitis, causes pain and stiffness in the shoulder. Over time, the shoulder becomes very hard to move. After a period of worsening symptoms, frozen shoulder tends to get better, although full recovery may take up to 3 years. Physical therapy, with a focus on shoulder flexibility, is the primary treatment recommendation for frozen shoulder. Frozen shoulder most commonly affects people between the ages of 40 and 60, and occurs in women more often than men. In addition, people with diabetes are at an increased risk for developing frozen shoulder. In frozen shoulder, the shoulder capsule thickens and becomes stiff and tight. Thick bands of tissue — called adhesions — develop. In many cases, there is less synovial fluid in the joint. The hallmark signs of this condition are severe pain and being unable to move your shoulder — either on your own or with the help of someone else. Frozen shoulder generally gets better over time, although it may take up to 3 years. The focus of treatment is to control pain and restore motion and strength through physical therapy.

  • AAOS
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December 3, 2018

 A hip fracture is a break in the upper quarter of the femur (thigh) bone. The extent of the break depends on the forces that are involved. The type of surgery used to treat a hip fracture is primarily based on the bones and soft tissues affected or on the level of the fracture. Hip fractures most commonly occur from a fall or from a direct blow to the side of the hip. With winter weather, hip fractures related to falls from icy pavements are extremely common! Be sure to take precautions when walking outside to prevent a slip and fall! 

  • AAOS
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November 19, 2018

 Arthritis can affect people all through the year, however the winter and wet weather months can make it harder to manage the symptoms. The cold and damp weather affects those living with arthritis as climate can create increased pain to joints whilst changes also occur to exercise routines. So, what to do to prevent the aches and pains? During winter dressing warmly is the key. Paying special attention to the head, hands and feet, as majority of heat is lost from the body’s extremities. The cold and damp weather can also cause changes to people’s exercise plans. We have an instinct during winter to hibernate; however, a lack of physical activity will cause joints to become stiff. Exercise eases arthritis pain. It increases strength and flexibility, reduces joint pain, and helps combat fatigue. To manage arthritic conditions during the cooler months, individuals need to plan physical activities that are easy to do during winter. So when your joints start to warn you of miserable weather ahead, plan a warm routine of indoor exercise, rustle up your cozy clothing, or book yourself a two month holiday to a warmer destination!

  • Arthritis Foundation 
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November 6, 2018

A rotator cuff tear is a common cause of pain and disability among adults. In 2013, almost 2 million people in the United States went to their doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means that many daily activities, like combing your hair or getting dressed, may become painful and difficult to do. When one or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the head of the humerus. There are two main causes of rotator cuff tears: injury and degeneration.   Because most rotator cuff tears are largely caused by the normal wear and tear that goes along with aging, people over 40 are at greater risk. People who do repetitive lifting or overhead activities are also at risk for rotator cuff tears. Athletes are especially vulnerable to overuse tears, particularly tennis players and baseball pitchers. Painters, carpenters, and others who do overhead work also have a greater chance for tears. Although overuse tears caused by sports activity or overhead work also occur in younger people, most tears in young adults are caused by a traumatic injury, like a fall. If you have a rotator cuff tear and you keep using it despite increasing pain, you may cause further damage. A rotator cuff tear can get larger over time. The

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October 28, 2018

 Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondylitis, is a painful condition of the elbow caused by overuse. Not surprisingly, playing tennis or other racquet sports can cause this condition. However, several other sports and activities can also put you at risk. Tennis elbow is an inflammation of the tendons that join the forearm muscles on the outside of the elbow. The forearm muscles and tendons become damaged from overuse — repeating the same motions again and again. This leads to pain and tenderness on the outside of the elbow. There are many treatment options for tennis elbow. Treatment options include rest, NSAIDs, bracing, steroid injections, PRP injections, and possible surgery. 

  • AAOS
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October 22, 2018

Achilles tendinitis is a common condition that occurs when the large tendon that runs down the back of your lower leg becomes irritated and inflamed. The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body. It connects your calf muscles to your heel bone and is used when you walk, run, climb stairs, jump, and stand on your tip toes. Although the Achilles tendon can withstand great stresses from running and jumping, it is also prone to tendinitis, a condition associated with overuse and degeneration.  Achilles tendinitis is typically not related to a specific injury. The problem results from repetitive stress to the tendon. This often happens when we push our bodies to do too much, too soon, but other factors can make it more likely to develop tendinitis, including: sudden increase in the amount or intensity of exercise activity, having tight calf muscles and suddenly starting an aggressive exercise, or bone spurs—extra bone growth where the Achilles tendon attaches to the heel bone can rub against the tendon and cause pain.  Treatment options include rest, ice, NSAIDs, exercise, physical therapy, cortisone injections, supportive shoes and orthotics, and possibly surgery. 

  • AAOS
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September 24, 2018

Plantar fasciitis (fashee-EYE-tiss) is the most common cause of pain on the bottom of the heel. Approximately 2 million patients are treated for this condition every year. Plantar fasciitis occurs when the strong band of tissue that supports the arch of your foot becomes irritated and inflamed. The plantar fascia is designed to absorb the high stresses and strains we place on our feet. But, sometimes, too much pressure damages or tears the tissues. The body’s natural response to injury is inflammation, which results in the heel pain and stiffness of plantar fasciitis. More than 90% of patients with plantar fasciitis will improve within 10 months of starting simple treatment methods such as rest, ice, NSAIDs, exercises, corticosteroid injections, supportive shoes and orthotics, night splints and physical therapy. 

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